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NWDHurricanesThe 2020 Hurricane Seasone Is Record-Breaking

The 2020 Hurricane Seasone Is Record-Breaking

hurricane record

Scientists made a forecast for 2020 that claimed 25 storms would be named, but that number was exceeded, and so far, we have seen 30 named storms, 13 of which were hurricanes. This number of storms was a record compared to 2005 when 28 major storms hit.

Central America was just beginning to recover from Hurricane Jota when suddenly another major storm hit.

When Tropical Storm Wilfred formed, meteorologists ran out of letters to name them and had to resort to Greek letters. This has only happened once, and as you might guess, it was in 2005.

That season there were as many as six terrifying hurricanes that reached 170 miles per hour. Such a phenomenon is very rare in the Atlantic basin during this period.

Central America lost 60 lives during Hurricane Eta in November. Likewise, the Gulf Coast suffered losses from seven named storms. In the aftermath, thousands of people were left without power and beaches.

Louisiana met five storms that caused irreparable damage to New Orleans. Hurricane Laura brought winds over 150 miles per hour, destroying many buildings, homes, trees, and bridges. Six people died as a result of the disaster.

So, how does climate change affect the frequency of hurricanes in the Atlantic? In fact, the correlation between these two things is very direct. Climate change will increase the duration and activity of hurricanes in the future, and there is also the opinion among scientists that global warming increases the intensity of storms. They say that due to the high surface temperature of the Atlantic, storm activity increases. Climatologists are convinced that increased ocean temperatures are to blame.

Compared to past hurricanes, the intensities of those we see today are decreasing much more slowly than before. So, we can conclude that in the future we should expect stronger and more destructive hurricanes that will last much longer.

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